734 F.2d 133 (3rd Cir. 1984), 83-5396, Malley-Duff & Associates, Inc. v. Crown Life Ins. Co.

Docket Nº:Appeal of Kerry Patrick CRAIG in Nos. 83-5396 and 83-5406.
Citation:734 F.2d 133
Party Name:MALLEY-DUFF & ASSOCIATES, INC., a corporation v. CROWN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, a Corporation; Agency Holding Corporation, an Illinois Corporation; Agency Holding Corporation, an Ohio Corporation; Clarke Burton Lloyd, an individual; Kerry Patrick Craig, an individual; and Ellie M. Goldstein, an individual.
Case Date:May 07, 1984
Court:United States Courts of Appeals, Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit
 
FREE EXCERPT

Page 133

734 F.2d 133 (3rd Cir. 1984)

MALLEY-DUFF & ASSOCIATES, INC., a corporation

v.

CROWN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, a Corporation; Agency Holding

Corporation, an Illinois Corporation; Agency Holding

Corporation, an Ohio Corporation; Clarke Burton Lloyd, an

individual; Kerry Patrick Craig, an individual; and Ellie

M. Goldstein, an individual.

Appeal of Kerry Patrick CRAIG in Nos. 83-5396 and 83-5406.

MALLEY-DUFF & ASSOCIATES, INC., a corporation

v.

CROWN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, a Corporation; Agency Holding

Corporation, an Illinois Corporation; Agency Holding

Corporation, an Ohio Corporation; Clarke Burton Lloyd, an

individual; Kerry Patrick Craig, an individual; and Ellie

M. Goldstein, an individual.

Appeal of CROWN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY and Clarke Burton

Lloyd in No. 83- 5397.

MALLEY-DUFF & ASSOCIATES, INC., a corporation, in No. 83-5427,

v.

CROWN LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY, a Corporation; Agency Holding

Corporation, an Illinois Corporation; Agency Holding

Corporation, an Ohio Corporation; Clarke Burton Lloyd, an

individual; Kerry Patrick Craig, an individual; and Ellie

M. Goldstein, an individual.

Nos. 83-5396, 83-5397, 83-5406 and 83-5427.

United States Court of Appeals, Third Circuit

May 7, 1984

Argued March 5, 1984.

Rehearing and Rehearing In Banc Denied June 4, 1984.

Page 134

[Copyrighted Material Omitted]

Page 135

[Copyrighted Material Omitted]

Page 136

John H. Bingler, Jr. (argued), Glenn E. Bost, II, Michael R. Bucci, Jr., Thorp, Reed & Armstrong, Pittsburgh, Pa., for appellant, Kerry Patrick Craig, in Nos. 83-5396 and 83-5406.

Alexander Black (argued), Ramona J. Rokoski, Robert W. Brown, Buchanan Ingersoll, P.C., Pittsburgh, Pa., for appellants, Crown Life Ins. Co. and Clarke Burton Lloyd, in No. 83-5397.

H. Woodruff Turner (argued), David A. Borkovic (argued), Kirkpatrick, Lockhart, Johnson & Hutchison, Pittsburgh, Pa., for appellant, Malley-Duff & Associates, Inc., in No. 83-5427.

Before ALDISERT and HIGGINBOTHAM, Circuit Judges, and LATCHUM, District Judge. [*]

OPINION

ALDISERT, Circuit Judge.

Two major questions are presented in these cross-appeals from a judgment entered on a jury verdict in favor of Malley-Duff & Associates, Inc. In the appeal at No. 83-5427, we must decide whether the trial court erred in directing an adverse verdict on Malley-Duff's antitrust claim that alleged a collective refusal to deal (boycott) in violation of Sec. 1 of the Sherman Antitrust Act, 15 U.S.C. Sec. 1. In the appeals at Nos. 83-5396, 83-5397, and 83-5406, our primary task is to determine whether a new trial should be granted based on an inconsistency in the jury's verdict on state common law claims. Subsidiary issues involve several questions relating to admissibility and sufficiency of evidence and alleged errors in jury instructions.

Malley-Duff, a Pittsburgh-based general insurance agency, charged that Crown Life Insurance Company, a Canadian life insurance carrier; Clarke Lloyd, its former vice president in charge of United States general agencies; Kerry Craig, a former Crown employee; and Agency Holding Corporation, a multi-state general agency representing Crown Life in the United States, all participated in a per se group boycott against it in violation of Sec. 1 of the Sherman Act. It also alleged that the defendants were liable under Pennsylvania common law because they conspired to tortiously interfere with Malley-Duff's Pittsburgh general agency contract with Crown Life and tortiously interfered with the contract. At the close of plaintiff's case, the district court directed a verdict for the defendants on the Sherman Act claim. After the close of all evidence, the jury found the defendants liable under one of the common law conspiracy charges and assessed damages of $900,000.00. All parties have appealed. We conclude that there was sufficient evidence on the antitrust claim to preclude a directed verdict and that the verdict form answers on the remaining state law claims were inconsistent. We, therefore, reverse the judgment of the district court and remand for a new trial.

I.

At trial, Malley-Duff presented a theory that Lloyd, while in charge of United States general agencies for Crown Life, masterminded a scheme to create the Agency Holding Company in conjunction with Craig to take over a number of Crown Life territories, and that, inter alia, they intended to freeze Malley-Duff out of the Crown Life insurance business in Pittsburgh and replace it with an agency controlled by their interests. To evaluate the various contentions, it is necessary to set forth in some detail the evidence presented

Page 137

at trial. To the extent that the antitrust claim was terminated by a directed verdict, we invoke the familiar rule that we "consider the record as a whole and in the light most favorable to the non-moving party, drawing all reasonable inferences to support its contentions." Tose v. First Pennsylvania Bank, N.A., 648 F.2d 879, 883 (3d Cir.) (quoting Edward J. Sweeney & Sons, Inc. v. Texaco, Inc., 637 F.2d 105, 115 (3d Cir.1980), cert. denied, 451 U.S. 911, 101 S.Ct. 1981, 68 L.Ed.2d 300 (1981)), cert. denied, 454 U.S. 893, 102 S.Ct. 390, 70 L.Ed.2d 208 (1981).

Malley-Duff presented direct and circumstantial evidence substantially as follows. In terms of insurance in force, Crown Life, located in Toronto, ranks in the top two percent of all life insurance companies operating in North America. At the time of the relevant events, Crown marketed its products in the United States through independent general agents, with agency contracts providing for commissions generally exceeding those offered by other life insurance companies.

The Malley-Duff agency was the oldest of seven Crown Life general agencies in Pennsylvania and represented Crown Life continuously and exclusively until its termination for a period of 23 years. The agency contract contained a 30-day termination clause. Malley-Duff did not have an exclusive franchise for Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, but competed with the Jules Ehrman Agency, a brokerage and personal producing general agency, for the sale of Crown Life products in the area. Malley-Duff sold insurance through independent agents who, in turn, dealt with consumers. The Ehrman Agency engaged in both personal production and brokerage sales. Notwithstanding this competition, Malley-Duff produced over $58,400,000 in business for Crown Life in the Pittsburgh area from 1967 to 1977.

Employed by Crown Life Insurance Company for over 30 years, Lloyd rose to the position of Senior Agency Vice-President for the United States. From at least 1976 until 1981, Crown Life vested Lloyd with complete and unfettered power to appoint and terminate general agents and to approve loans and financing for them.

Kerry Craig began with Crown in 1969 when he was only 21-years-old. For three years, he operated Xerox machines, but then was transferred to Lloyd's Agency Department where he served two years as a messenger until 1974. About a year later, Lloyd promoted the former Xerox operator and messenger to be a Supervisor of Agencies where he remained for two years until he left Crown Life to serve as the head of Agency Holding Corporation, which was formed in 1977 pursuant to Lloyd's instructions. Agency Holding became Crown Life's general agent in Chicago. Plaintiff contended that Lloyd and Craig controlled Agency Holding and used it to own and control general agencies in various parts of the United States, including Pittsburgh.

The creation of Agency Holding followed an interesting scenario. In October 1976, Crown Life's general agent in Chicago died. Lloyd, responsible for finding a replacement, revealed a plan to a friend, Dennis Cunningham, whose aid he attempted to enlist. Lloyd divulged that he was forming a "mega general agency holding corporation." App. at 1505a-06a. Beginning in Chicago, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Toledo, this mega general agency holding corporation was designed to control Crown Life's general agencies throughout the eastern United States. Plaintiff contended that the plan called for Craig and Robert Oglevee to join Lloyd in the operation, and Lloyd extended an invitation to Cunningham who declined to join.

Lloyd engaged Bruce Pennamped, an attorney in Indianapolis, Indiana, to incorporate Agency Holding Corporation in Illinois. Plaintiff contended that Pennamped was a nominee for Lloyd and Craig and that he was to front for Agency Holding until Craig, a Canadian national, received immigration permission to be employed in the United States. An indemnity agreement dated February 28, 1977, between the attorney and Crown sets forth Pennamped's

Page 138

duties more fully. Lloyd hired him to "assist in the organization, management, operation and financing of certain of [Crown Life's] general agencies located, or to be located, in Chicago, Illinois; Cleveland, Ohio; and, Pittsburg [sic], Pennsylvania ...." App. at 2616a; Supp.App. at 635a-36a. Pursuant to Lloyd's instructions, Pennamped made arrangements in January 1977 for Agency Holding to be qualified to do business in Ohio and Pennsylvania.

On February 11, 1977, Lloyd and Craig met with Chicago insurance executive Ralph Wood and offered Wood a position with Agency Holding. Lloyd explained that Agency Holding would be the new Chicago general agent and that it would control ten or twelve territories throughout the East, including Cleveland and Pittsburgh. Four or five vice-presidents were to be appointed and were to split 20 percent of the Agency Holding stock. Lloyd refused to divulge the identity of the 80 percent shareholder, and Mr. Wood declined the offer.

In March 1977, Crown Life, through Lloyd, appointed Agency...

To continue reading

FREE SIGN UP