Bateman v. Platte Cnty., No. SC 91898.

CourtUnited States State Supreme Court of Missouri
Writing for the CourtRICHARD B. TEITELMAN
Citation363 S.W.3d 39
PartiesRobert L. BATEMAN, et al., Respondents,James K. Owens, et al., Appellants, v. PLATTE COUNTY, Missouri, Respondent.
Decision Date03 April 2012
Docket NumberNo. SC 91898.

363 S.W.3d 39

Robert L. BATEMAN, et al., Respondents,James K. Owens, et al., Appellants,
v.
PLATTE COUNTY, Missouri, Respondent.

No. SC 91898.

Supreme Court of Missouri, En Banc.

April 3, 2012.


[363 S.W.3d 40]

James C. Bowers Jr., Mary Jo Shaney, Patricia R. Jensen, White Goss Bowers March Schulte & Weisenfels P.C., Kansas City, for the Property Owners.

Robert H. Shaw, McGinniss & Shaw LLC, Platte City, for the County.

Jonathan Sternberg, Jonathan Sternberg, Kansas City, for Bateman.RICHARD B. TEITELMAN, Chief Justice.

Platte County and several owners of lots in the Bridle Parc Estates subdivision appeal a judgment declaring Bridle Parc Lane (BP Lane) to be a private road. They assert that the action was barred by

[363 S.W.3d 41]

the 10–year statute of limitations provided in section 516.010, RSMo.1 Alternatively, they assert that BP Lane became a public road through statutory dedication, common law dedication and the establishment of a prescriptive easement. The judgment is affirmed.

FACTS

In 1980, Yiddy Bloom owned a single tract of land located south of Mace Road. Bloom's property was separated from Mace Road by three other properties. In September 1980, the owners of these three properties granted Bloom three separate, contiguous easements extending from Mace Road to Bloom's property. The easements provided the only access from Bloom's property to Mace Road and specifically granted Bloom and his “successors and assigns” a “street and right of way easement.”

In December 1980, Platte County approved a plat for the three properties traversed by Bloom's easements. The plat established the Bridle Parc Estates subdivision (BP–I) and depicted a street from Bloom's property to Mace Road. The street was located on Bloom's easements. The BP–I plat dedicated all streets and roads on the plats to public use. Bloom did not sign the plat.

In September 1984, Platte County approved a plat subdividing Bloom's property into the Bridle Parc Estates II subdivision (BP–II). The BP–II plat depicted a street running south from the street on the BP–I plat and terminating at the southern boundary of the BP–II subdivision. Like the BP–I plat, the BP–II plat dedicated all streets to public use and was not signed by Bloom. When BP–II was platted, the street through BP–II had no continuity with any public road.

After the BP–II plat was finalized, Bloom sold all of his BP–II lots to Robert Pease. Pease then sold all of the BP–II lots to new owners who signed the BP–II plat. The BP–II plat was amended in 1985 by consent of all of the BP–II landowners. The amendment corrected boundaries and rededicated a modified BP Lane to public use. The amended plat was recorded with Platte County on October 3, 1988.

In 2005, a developer attempted to plat a new subdivision within BP–II and sought Platte County's approval to use BP Lane as a public road. BP–II resident Robert Bateman objected and notified Platte County of the private easements on which BP Lane was situated. On May 25, 2006, the County notified Bateman of its determination that “Bridle Parc Lane is within public right-of-way.”

On July 7, 2006, Bateman filed a two-count petition against the county seeking declaratory and injunctive relief. Bateman's petition asserted that BP Lane could not be dedicated to public use at the time BP–I and BP–II were platted because the easement owners never had consented to the dedication.

Platte County filed an answer denying the claims in the petition and asserting Bateman's claims were “untimely and barred by the statute of limitations.” The circuit court permitted other landowners in BP–I and BP–II to intervene as either plaintiffs or defendants in the lawsuit.

The circuit court conducted a bench trial. Platte County and the intervening defendants argued that BP Lane had been dedicated statutorily to public use through the recorded BP–I and BP–II plats. Alternatively, they argued that BP Lane became a public road through a common law dedication or prescriptive easement.

[363 S.W.3d 42]

Bateman and the intervening plaintiffs (collectively, plaintiffs) argued that BP Lane never was dedicated to public use because the easement holders, beginning with Yiddy Bloom, never relinquished their private easements. Plaintiffs also presented testimony supporting their position that BP Lane was used primarily by subdivision residents and never was used by the general public as a public road.

The circuit court entered a judgment declaring BP Lane to be a private road. The circuit court found that BP Lane was “never legally dedicated to public use” because the easement holders did not consent to the dedication. The court also found that BP Lane was used as a private road, not a public road. The court did not address the statute of limitations defense. Defendants appeal.

ANALYSIS
I. Section 516.010

Defendants assert that the circuit court erred in failing to determine that Bateman's claim for declaratory judgment was barred by the 10–year statute of limitations in Section 516.010. The applicability of a statute of limitation argument presents a question of law subject to de novo review. Warren County Concrete, L.L.C v. Peoples Bank & Trust Co., 340 S.W.3d 289, 290 (Mo.App.2011).

The circuit court properly declined to address defendant's statute of limitations defense because the defense was waived. Rule 55.08 requires a party to plead all affirmative defenses, including a statute of limitations defense. In Knisely v. Leathe, 256 Mo. 341, 166 S.W. 257, 261 (1914), this Court held that one seeking to take advantage of the statute of limitations “must plead the very provision on which he depends.' ” Modine Manufacturing Company v. Carlock, 510 S.W.2d 462, 467 (Mo.1974); see also Reynolds v. Carter County, 323 S.W.3d 447, 452 (Mo.App.2010); Southwestern Bell Telephone Co. v. Buie, 758 S.W.2d 157, 161 (Mo.App.1988).

In this case, the county's initial answer alleged only that Bateman's claims were “untimely and barred by the statute of limitations.”...

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5 practice notes
  • K.L.M. v. B.A.G., No. ED 104922
    • United States
    • Court of Appeal of Missouri (US)
    • 10 Octubre 2017
    ...evidence and permissible inferences drawn from the evidence in the light most favorable to the judgment." Bateman v. Platte Cty., 363 S.W.3d 39, 43 (Mo. banc 2012). However, we must keep in mind that "[b]ecause of the potential stigma that may attach to an individual who is labele......
  • State ex rel. Barks v. Pelikan, SC99024
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court of Missouri
    • 1 Marzo 2022
    ...affirmative relief"). Affirmative defenses must be affirmatively pleaded or they are waived. See Rule 55.08; Bateman v. Platte Cty., 363 S.W.3d 39, 42 (Mo. banc 2012). Accordingly, Barks' assertion of the affirmative defenses of comparative fault and assumption of risk remains involunt......
  • N. L.P. v. C.G.W., No. ED 99738.
    • United States
    • Court of Appeal of Missouri (US)
    • 17 Diciembre 2013
    ...the evidence and permissible inferences drawn from the evidence in the light most favorable to the judgment.” Bateman v. Platte County, 363 S.W.3d 39, 43 (Mo. banc 2012). “Because of the potential stigma that may attach to an individual who is labeled a ‘stalker’ under the Missouri Adult Ab......
  • DiGregorio Food Prods., Inc. v. Racanelli, No. SC 98443
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court of Missouri
    • 3 Noviembre 2020
    ...marks omitted). The applicability of a statute of limitations is a question of law this Court reviews de novo. Bateman v. Platte Cnty. , 363 S.W.3d 39, 42 (Mo. banc 2012).Analysis"Missouri has two statutes of limitation relating generally to contract actions: sections 516.110(1) and 51......
  • Request a trial to view additional results
5 cases
  • K.L.M. v. B.A.G., No. ED 104922
    • United States
    • Court of Appeal of Missouri (US)
    • 10 Octubre 2017
    ...evidence and permissible inferences drawn from the evidence in the light most favorable to the judgment." Bateman v. Platte Cty., 363 S.W.3d 39, 43 (Mo. banc 2012). However, we must keep in mind that "[b]ecause of the potential stigma that may attach to an individual who is labele......
  • State ex rel. Barks v. Pelikan, SC99024
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court of Missouri
    • 1 Marzo 2022
    ...affirmative relief"). Affirmative defenses must be affirmatively pleaded or they are waived. See Rule 55.08; Bateman v. Platte Cty., 363 S.W.3d 39, 42 (Mo. banc 2012). Accordingly, Barks' assertion of the affirmative defenses of comparative fault and assumption of risk remains involunt......
  • N. L.P. v. C.G.W., No. ED 99738.
    • United States
    • Court of Appeal of Missouri (US)
    • 17 Diciembre 2013
    ...the evidence and permissible inferences drawn from the evidence in the light most favorable to the judgment.” Bateman v. Platte County, 363 S.W.3d 39, 43 (Mo. banc 2012). “Because of the potential stigma that may attach to an individual who is labeled a ‘stalker’ under the Missouri Adult Ab......
  • DiGregorio Food Prods., Inc. v. Racanelli, No. SC 98443
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court of Missouri
    • 3 Noviembre 2020
    ...marks omitted). The applicability of a statute of limitations is a question of law this Court reviews de novo. Bateman v. Platte Cnty. , 363 S.W.3d 39, 42 (Mo. banc 2012).Analysis"Missouri has two statutes of limitation relating generally to contract actions: sections 516.110(1) and 51......
  • Request a trial to view additional results

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