Clellan v. Chipman Traders Nat Bank v. Same, Nos. 35

CourtUnited States Supreme Court
Writing for the CourtWHITE
Citation41 L.Ed. 461,164 U.S. 347,17 S.Ct. 85
Docket Number36,Nos. 35
Decision Date30 November 1896
PartiesMcCLELLAN v. CHIPMAN. TRADERS' NAT. BANK v. SAME

164 U.S. 347
17 S.Ct. 85
41 L.Ed. 461
McCLELLAN

v.

CHIPMAN. TRADERS' NAT. BANK v. SAME.

Nos. 35, 36.
November 30, 1896.

The Traders' National Bank, a corporation organized under the banking laws of the United States, carried on its business in the city of Boston. The firm of Dudley Hall & Co., composed of Dudley Hall and Dudley C. Hall, were likewise engaged in business in Boston, and were customers of the bank, having a deposit account therein. By an understanding between the bank and the firm, made to induce the latter

Page 348

to keep its deposit account with the former, the firm was to be considered as entitled to a line of discourt on its paper to the extent of $20,000. On the 16th of October, 1890, the partnership then being in the enjoyment of its full agreed-on discount, borrowed from the bank an additional sum of $12,500, which was evidenced by a note of Dudley C. Hall at one month, indorsed by the firm, and secured by the pledge of certain shares of the Aetna Mining Company and by two notes of that company, amounting to about $2,500. When this note matured, on the 16th of November, 1890, a new demand note in an equal amount was given in renewal thereof, and was secured by the same collaterals. On the 17th of December, 1890, payment of this note was demanded, and, the debtor being unable to meet it, a new note at two months was given, the sum thereof was passed to the credit of the firm, and the old note was debited, canceled, and surrendered. This new note was drawn, like the preceding one, by Hall, and indorsed by the firm, and was secured, not only by the same collaterals, but also by a conveyance of two pieces of land made by Dudley C. Hall to A. D. McClellan, a director of the bank, he giving to Hall a writing, in which it was declared that the conveyance was made for the sole purpose of securing the note held by the bank, and that on its payment the land would be retransferred. In March, 1891, the firm suspended payment, and the members thereof were adjudged to be insolvent under the insolvency laws of the state of Massachusetts, and made to their assignees an assignment of all their property, as required by the statutes of the state. In May the assignees brought a writ of entry against McClellan to recover the two pieces of land.

Sections 96 and 93 of chapter 157 of the Public Statutes of the state of Massachusetts, relied on by the assignees to sustain their action to recover the land, are as follows:

'Sec. 96. If a person, being insolvent or in contemplation of insolvency, within six months before the filing of the petition by or against him, with a view to give a preference to a creditor or person who has a claim against him, or is under any liability for him, procures any part of his property to be

Page 349

attached, sequestered or seized on execution, or makes any payment, pledge, assignment, transfer or conveyance of any part of his property, either directly or indirectly, absolutely or conditionally, the person receiving such payment, pledge, assignment, transfer or conveyance, or to be benefited thereby, having reasonable cause to believe such person is insolvent or in contemplation of insolvency, and that such payment, pledge, assignment or conveyance is made in fraud of the laws relating to insolvency, the same shall be void; and the assignees may recover the property or the value of it from the person so receiving it or so to be benefited.'

'Sec. 98. If a person, being insolvent or in contemplation of insolvency, within six months before the filing of the petition by or against him, makes a sale, assignment, transfer or other conveyance of any description of any part of his property to a person who then has reasonable cause to believe him to be insolvent or in contemplation of insolvency, and that such sale, assignment, transfer or other conveyance is made with a view to prevent the property from coming to his assignee in insolvency, or to prevent the same from being distributed under the laws relating to insolvency, or to defeat the object of, or in any way to impair, hinder, impede or delay the operation and effect of, or to evade any of said provisions, the sale, assignment, transfer or conveyance thereof shall be void, and the assignee may recover the property or the value thereof as assets of the insolvent. And if such sale, assignment, transfer or conveyance is not made in the usual and ordinary course of business of the debtor, that fact shall be prima facie evidence of such cause of belief.'

The action was tried before a jury, and there was a verdict in favor of the surviving assignee, and exceptions were filed and allowed. While these exceptions were pending before the supreme judicial court, the Traders' Bank filed its bill in equity against the surviving assignee of the estate of Dudley C. Hall and Dudley Hall and A. D. McClellan, setting up its right under the conveyance made to McClellan, the bringing of the writ of entry, and the fact that the bank had not been made party defendant therein. The bill charged

Page 350

that the complainant, as a national bank, was entitled to take the conveyance of the real estate to secure the debt of Hall, and that the provisions of...

To continue reading

Request your trial
97 practice notes
  • Bank activities and operations and real estate lending and appraisals: National banks; State law applicability,
    • United States
    • Federal Register January 13, 2004
    • January 13, 2004
    ...abandoned deposit accounts did not ``unlawful[ly] encroac[h] on the rights and privileges of national banks''); McClellan v. Chipman, 164 U.S. 347, 358 (1896) (application to national banks of state statute forbidding certain real estate transfers by insolvent transferees would not ``destro......
  • National banks: Authority provided by American Homeownership and Economic Opportunity Act, and other miscellaneous amendments,
    • United States
    • Federal Register February 07, 2003
    • February 7, 2003
    ...national legislation, or impairs the efficiency of the bank to discharge the duties for which it was created.''); McClellan v. Chipman, 164 U.S. 347, 358 (1896) (application to national banks of state statute forbidding certain real estate transfers by insolvent transferees would not ``dest......
  • Larabee v. Dolley, 8,810
    • United States
    • United States District Courts. 10th Circuit. United States District Courts. 10th Circuit. District of Kansas
    • December 23, 1909
    ...respect to the powers conferred upon them, are to be viewed as solely organized and operated for private gain.' In McClellan v. Chipman, 164 U.S. 347, 17 Sup.Ct. 85, 41 L.Ed. 461, Mr. Justice White, delivering the opinion of the court, said: 'National banks 'are subject to the laws of the s......
  • Perdue v. Crocker National Bank, S.F. 24591
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court (California)
    • July 18, 1985
    ...for which the national banks were created, or impair their efficiency to discharge [their] duties...." (McClellan v. Chipman (1896) 164 U.S. 347, 357, 17 S.Ct. 85, 87, 41 L.Ed. 461.) Page 363 [702 P.2d 521] The assertion in the regulation that state laws limiting bank service charges "are p......
  • Request a trial to view additional results
96 cases
  • Larabee v. Dolley, 8,810
    • United States
    • United States District Courts. 10th Circuit. United States District Courts. 10th Circuit. District of Kansas
    • December 23, 1909
    ...respect to the powers conferred upon them, are to be viewed as solely organized and operated for private gain.' In McClellan v. Chipman, 164 U.S. 347, 17 Sup.Ct. 85, 41 L.Ed. 461, Mr. Justice White, delivering the opinion of the court, said: 'National banks 'are subject to the laws of the s......
  • Perdue v. Crocker National Bank, S.F. 24591
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court (California)
    • July 18, 1985
    ...for which the national banks were created, or impair their efficiency to discharge [their] duties...." (McClellan v. Chipman (1896) 164 U.S. 347, 357, 17 S.Ct. 85, 87, 41 L.Ed. 461.) Page 363 [702 P.2d 521] The assertion in the regulation that state laws limiting bank service charges "are p......
  • Hood v. Santa Barbara Bank & Trust, No. B184489.
    • United States
    • California Court of Appeals
    • September 28, 2006
    ...consumer protection in general and of the banking and insurance industries in particular.'" (Ibid.; see also McClellan v. Chipman (1896) 164 U.S. 347, 356-357, 17 S.Ct. 85, 41 L.Ed. 461; Peatros v. Bank of America (2000) 22 Cal.4th 147, 159, 91 Cal.Rptr.2d 659, 990 P.2d 539; National State ......
  • Mayo v. Dean Witter Reynolds, Inc., No. C-01-20336JF (PVT).
    • United States
    • United States District Courts. 9th Circuit. United States District Courts. 9th Circuit. Northern District of California
    • April 22, 2003
    ...the purpose of national legislation or impairs the efficiencies of federal agencies to discharge their duties. McClellan v. Chipman, 164 U.S. 347, 357, 17 S.Ct. 85, 41 L.Ed. 461 Morgan Stanley, Intervenors, and the SEC argue that the California standards are preempted by the Exchange Act an......
  • Request a trial to view additional results

VLEX uses login cookies to provide you with a better browsing experience. If you click on 'Accept' or continue browsing this site we consider that you accept our cookie policy. ACCEPT