Fairfield Merrittview Ltd. P'ship v. City of Norwalk

Decision Date11 April 2017
Docket NumberAC 34950
Citation172 Conn.App. 160,159 A.3d 684
Parties FAIRFIELD MERRITTVIEW LIMITED PARTNERSHIP v. CITY OF NORWALK, et al
CourtConnecticut Court of Appeals

James R. Fogarty, with whom, on the brief, were Frank W. Murphy and Kara A. Murphy, for the appellants (plaintiff et al.).

Carolyn M. Colangelo, assistant corporation counsel, with whom were Mario F. Coppola, corporation counsel, and, on the brief, Robert F. Maslan, Jr., former corporation counsel, for the appellees (defendants).

Alvord, Sheldon and Harper, Js.

SHELDON, J.

In this real estate tax appeal, the defendant city of Norwalk1 appeals from the judgment of the trial court sustaining the appeal of the plaintiff, Fairfield Merrittview SPE, LLC,2 pursuant to General Statutes § 12–117a,3 and ordering the reduction of the defendant's tax assessment levied against the plaintiff's real property. The defendant raises two arguments in support of its claim that the court erred when it reduced the subject property's assessed fair market value, as of October 1, 2008, from $49,036,800 to $34,059,753.4 First, the defendant claims that the court improperly relied upon a 2006 "annual income and expense report" to calculate the property's net rentable area, when instead it should have used the plaintiff's December 2008 rent roll for that purpose, because the 2008 rent roll assertedly reflected the subject property's net rentable area as of October 1, 2008, more accurately than the 2006 report. Second, the defendant argues that the court improperly excluded $190,000 of "other income" attributable to the subject property from its calculations and, therefore, the court's calculation regarding the property's potential gross income was clearly erroneous. We affirm the judgment of the trial court.

The record reveals the following facts. The subject property, an eight story, class A multitenant office building that was constructed in 1985, sits on a 4.3 acre parcel located at 383 Main Avenue in Norwalk. The ground floor of the property consists of a lobby, a cafeteria, a fitness center and a conference room, which are all maintained for the benefit of the building's tenants. These amenities account for approximately 6400 square feet of space. Additionally, there is a three level parking garage underneath the building which provides 743 parking spaces on a total surface area of 150,227 square feet. The area surrounding 383 Main Street consists of high density commercial developments, as well as retail and corporate offices. The subject property's location provides quick access to: the Merritt Parkway; the Route 7 connector highway, which provides access to Interstate 95; and the Metro–North passenger train station, which operates between New Haven and New York City.

On October 1, 2008, as part of a citywide revaluation, the defendant's assessor determined that the subject property had a fair market value5 of $49,036,800. Thereafter, the plaintiff appealed to the Board of Assessment Appeals of the City of Norwalk (board), pursuant to General Statutes § 12–111,6 claiming that the property's assessed value grossly exceeded its actual value.7 The board dismissed the appeal and upheld the property's assessed value and corresponding tax assessment. On July 21, 2009, the plaintiff appealed, pursuant to § 12–117a, to the Superior Court for the judicial district of Stamford–Norwalk. There, the plaintiff renewed its claim that the defendant's assessment of the subject property was grossly excessive, and therefore warranted reduction. A two day trial was then held on December 14 and 15, 2011.

During the trial, each party called an appraiser to testify as to the subject property's October 2008 fair market value. Eric Michel testified on behalf of the plaintiff; Michael Fazio testified on behalf of the defendant. Both witnesses stated that they employed the sales approach8 and the income capitalization approach9 to determine the property's fair market value. Ultimately, each appraiser testified that the income capitalization approach was the most appropriate method for determining the property's fair market value as of October 1, 2008 because a prospective purchaser would most likely use that method when attempting to purchase the property.10 Using the income capitalization approach, Michel concluded that the property had a fair market value of $30,500,000 as of October 1, 2008, whereas Fazio concluded that the property then had a fair market value of $49,400,000.

Despite their different conclusions, both appraisers agreed on several factors relevant to the trial court's decision. Both appraisers agreed: that the property's highest and best use,11 as improved, was its continued use as a multitenant office building; that, in applying the income capitalization approach, the direct capitalization method12 was the preferred method for determining the property's fair market value; that, pursuant to the direct capitalization method, the applicable vacancy and collection rate was 10 percent; and that the property's market rental value, pursuant to General Statutes § 12–63b,13 should be valued at $25 per square foot. They disagreed, however, on several figures included in the direct capitalization formula. Specifically, they disagreed as to: (1) the property's net rentable area; (2) the property's potential gross income; and (3) the overall capitalization rate14 that should be applied under the direct capitalization formula. Their differences, more particularly, were as follows.

Regarding the property's net rentable area, Michel testified that his calculation was based upon the tax assessor's field assessment card, which reported that the property had a net rentable area of 238,879 square feet. Fazio's calculation, on the other hand, was based on an oral representation by Tara Deluca, an agent of the plaintiff, that the property had a net rentable area of 256,974 square feet.

As for the property's potential gross income (PGI), Michel testified that he multiplied the market rental value of $25 per square foot, on a "gross electric basis,"15 by 238,879 square feet of net rentable area to arrive at a PGI of $5,971,975. Fazio's calculation, by contrast, resulted in a PGI of $7,847,825. Although Fazio agreed that the market rental value was $25 per square foot, he included two additional reimbursements which he found to increase the property's value by $4.80 per square foot.16 Additionally, Fazio's formula included $190,000 in "other income" that he believed to be attributable to the property, which included "conference room income, tenant other income, and ... interest income."

Concerning the overall capitalization rate, both appraisers agreed that as of October 1, 2008, the capitalization rate was 7.5 percent. They disagreed, however, as to what effective tax rate should be added to that figure to arrive at the overall capitalization rate; Michel testified that 1.35 percent should be added, resulting in an overall capitalization rate of 8.85 percent, while Fazio testified that 1.39 percent should be added, resulting in an overall capitalization rate of 8.89 percent.

On August 6, 2012, the trial court, Hon. Arnold W. Aronson , judge trial referee, issued its memorandum of decision. With regard to the property's net rentable area, the court noted that several documents admitted into evidence reflected dramatically different figures and that, depending on which exhibit it relied upon, the property's net rentable area varied by approximately 15,000 square feet. After reviewing the evidence presented, the court concluded that it was " more credible to turn to the 2006 annual income and expense report filed by [the plaintiff] with the city's assessor, as required by General Statutes § 12–63c, showing the subject's gross square footage at 249,986 [square feet] and [net rentable area] at 243,586 [square feet]."17 With regard to the property's PGI, the court rejected Michel's proposal of $25 per square foot on a gross electric basis as well as Fazio's inclusion of reimbursements and "other income." Instead, the court compared the subject property's market rent to its contract rent and concluded that a value of $26 per square foot was "a fair resolution of the subject's potential gross income, as of October 1, 2008." Accordingly, the court multiplied the market value of $26 per square foot by the net rentable area of 243,586 square feet, resulting in a PGI of $6,333,236, as of October 1, 2008.18 Finally, with regard to the overall capitalization rate, the court adopted Fazio's proposed overall capitalization rate of 8.89 percent. Applying these figures to the direct capitalization formula, the court concluded that the subject property's fair market value, as of October 1, 2008, was $34,059,753. Because this figure was less than the defendant's assessment of $49,036,800, the court ordered a reduction in the assessment to reflect the difference in the property's fair market value. Thereafter, the defendant filed its appeal.

Additional facts will be set forth as necessary.

I

The defendant first claims that the court's factual finding regarding the property's net rentable area was clearly erroneous. Specifically, the defendant argues that, in determining the net rentable area of the property, the trial court improperly relied on a 2006 annual income and expense report to determine the building's gross square footage. See footnote 17 of this opinion. The defendant argues that the information in that report as to the property's net rentable area was outdated, and thus that the court should have used the plaintiff's 2008 rent roll to determine that area instead. The defendant contends that, by relying on such outdated information, the court failed to account for 14,687 square feet of net rentable area, thereby erroneously reducing the property's fair market value by $3,865,870. We find no error.

"Our review of the court's determination in a tax appeal is limited. [W]e do not examine the...

To continue reading

Request your trial
5 cases
  • Digital 60 & 80 Merritt, LLC v. Bd. of Assessment Appeals of the Town of Trumbull
    • United States
    • Connecticut Court of Appeals
    • April 5, 2022
    ...a property can produce is related to its market value." (Internal quotation marks omitted.) Fairfield Merrittview Ltd. Partnership v. Norwalk , 172 Conn. App. 160, 165 n.9, 159 A.3d 684, cert. denied, 326 Conn. 901, 162 A.3d 724 (2017)."The income capitalization approach consists of the fol......
  • City of Bridgeport v. Grace Bldg., LLC
    • United States
    • Connecticut Court of Appeals
    • April 24, 2018
    ...393, 886 A.2d 391 (2005), cert. denied, 547 U.S. 1148, 126 S.Ct. 2296, 164 L.Ed. 2d 815 (2006) ; Fairfield Merrittview Ltd. Partnership v. Norwalk , 172 Conn. App. 160, 171 n.19, 159 A.3d 684, cert. denied, 326 Conn. 901, 162 A.3d 724 (2017). That precept does not apply when the claim is on......
  • Ryan v. Cassella
    • United States
    • Connecticut Court of Appeals
    • March 27, 2018
    ...before the reviewing court." Grimm v. Grimm , supra, 276 Conn. at 393, 886 A.2d 391 ; see also Fairfield Merrittview Ltd. Partnership v. Norwalk , 172 Conn. App. 160, 171 n.19, 159 A.3d 684, cert. denied, 326 Conn. 901, 162 A.3d 724 (2017).To the extent that the defendant professes any conf......
  • Fairfield Merrittview Ltd. P'ship v. City of Norwalk
    • United States
    • Connecticut Supreme Court
    • May 24, 2017
    ...R. Fogarty, in opposition.The named defendant's petition for certification for appeal from the Appellate Court, 172 Conn. App. 160, 159 A.3d 684 (2017), is ...
  • Request a trial to view additional results
1 books & journal articles
  • 2017 Survey of Connecticut Tax Law Developments
    • United States
    • Connecticut Bar Association Connecticut Bar Journal No. 92, 2019
    • Invalid date
    ...16, 2017). [51] Conn. Pub. Act No. 17-126, § 1 (effective January 1, 2018). [52] 324 Conn. 528 (2017). [53] 324 Conn. 544 (2017). [54] 172 Conn. App. 160, cert, denied, 326 Conn. 901 (2017). [55] 175 Conn. App. 369 (2017). [56] 177 Conn. App. 183 (2017). [57] 2017 WL 4159721 (Hartford Super......

VLEX uses login cookies to provide you with a better browsing experience. If you click on 'Accept' or continue browsing this site we consider that you accept our cookie policy. ACCEPT