Jay v. State, 30593

Decision Date19 April 1965
Docket NumberNo. 30593,30593
Citation246 Ind. 534,206 N.E.2d 128
PartiesRobert Lee JAY and Bernie Eugene Gipson, Appellants, v. STATE of Indiana, Appellee.
CourtIndiana Supreme Court

John D. Clouse, Evansville, for appellants.

Edwin K. Steers, Atty. Gen., Davis S. Wedding, Deputy Atty. Gen., for appellee.

LANDIS, Judge.

Appellants were charged by affidavit with first degree burglary and after a jury trial were convicted of entering to commit a felony for which they were sentenced one to ten years in the Indiana Reformatory.

Appellant Gipson has heretofore filed motion to dismiss the appeal as to him, and this Court has sustained said motion and the appeal is therefore dismissed as to appellant Gipson.

Appellant Jay first contends the verdict is contrary to law for the reason that there was insufficient evidence to prove the George Koch Realty Corporation owned the dwelling house burglarized. The affidavit in this respect charged that appellant

'* * * did * * * burglariously break and enter into the dwelling house of GEORGE KOCH REALTY CORPORATION, in which NOAH HARP then lived, with intent to commit a felony, to-wit: to unlawfully take, steal and carry away the goods, chattels and personal property of the said NOAH HARP.'

The evidence introduced at the trial fully supports the allegation in the affidavit that Noah Harp was in possession of the dwelling house burglarized. The evidence was therefore sufficient to sustain the verdict as against appellant's contention, for it is well settled that burglary is a crime against the possessory interest or rightful possession of the premises. See: Bradley v. State (1964), Ind., 195 N.E.2d 347, 349, and the discussion and authorities therein contained.

It is therefore immaterial that the evidence may not have sufficiently shown that the George Koch Realty Corporation was the owner of the house burglarized, and such allegation of the affidavit may be treated as surplusage.

Appellant further contends the court erred in overruling appellant's objection to a question propounded by appellee as to who was the owner of the property on 2001 West Ohio. However, it does not appear that this question was answered and therefore no question is before us as to the correctness of the court's ruling. See: Polson v. State (1965), (not yet reported); Henderson v. State (1956), 235 Ind. 132, 134, 131 N.E.2d 326, 327.

Appellant also contends it was error for the trial court to permit Alma Jean Farley, an alleged accomplice of appellant, to testify. Appellant cites Burns' Sec. 9-1603 (1956 Repl.), 1 as follows:

'Who are competent witnesses.--The following persons are competent witnesses:

* * *

* * *

'Third. Accomplices, when they consent to testify.'

Appellant complains that he was not permitted to make an offer of proof that the witness was an accomplice and would not consent to testify. The record fails to bear out appellant's contention for it fails to disclose any effort was made whatever by appellant to show that this witness had not consented to testify and therefore no question is presented.

The fact that the witness took the stand creates the presumption that she did so voluntarily. The fact that she answered all questions propounded to her forthrightly and without hostility is strongly indicative that she was a voluntary witness. Moreover, on appellant's cross-examination of the witness it is interesting to note that at no time did appellant ask the witness whether she voluntarily consented to testify for the State. This contention is without merit.

Appellant has further contended the court erred in failing to grant his motion for continuance on the ground appellant was surprised when George Elsea was called as a witness for the State.

The matter of whether a continuance will be granted rests within the sound discretion of the trial court and the court's ruling will not be disturbed in the absence of a clear showing of an abuse of discretion. Liese v. State (1954), 233 Ind. 250, 254, 118 N.E.2d 731, 733; In re Holovachka (1964), Ind., 198 N.E.2d 381, 394. There was no showing here by appellant that he was harmed by the trial court's ruling and we must conclude the denial of the motion for continuance was not reversible error.

Appellant next urges that it was error for the court to reject...

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29 cases
  • Kindred v. State
    • United States
    • Indiana Supreme Court
    • June 28, 1989
    ...only if there is a clear showing of an abuse of discretion. Miller v. State (1971), 256 Ind. 296, 268 N.E.2d 299; Jay v. State (1965), 246 Ind. 534, 206 N.E.2d 128. In determining whether good cause exists, the trial judge may look to the circumstances of the case as well as the allegations......
  • Forrester v. State
    • United States
    • Indiana Supreme Court
    • October 7, 1982
    ...* *. "Third. Accomplices, when they consent to testify. * * *." The record of the accomplice's testimony is similar to Jay v. State, (1965) 246 Ind. 534, 206 N.E.2d 128 where we rejected a similar "Appellant complains that he was not permitted to make an offer of proof that the witness was ......
  • Bryan v. State
    • United States
    • Indiana Supreme Court
    • August 11, 1982
    ...only if there is a clear showing of an abuse of discretion. Miller v. State, (1971) 256 Ind. 296, 268 N.E.2d 299; Jay v. State, (1965) 246 Ind. 534, 206 N.E.2d 128. In determining whether good cause exists, the trial judge may look to the circumstances of the case as well as the allegations......
  • Phillips v. State
    • United States
    • Indiana Appellate Court
    • March 12, 1979
    ...if there is a clear showing of an abuse of discretion. Miller v. State, (1971), 256 Ind. 296, 268 N.E.2d 299, 301; Jay v. State, (1965) 246 Ind. 534, 206 N.E.2d 128, 130; Blume v. State, (1963) 244 Ind. 121, 189 N.E.2d 568, 570. In determining whether good cause exists, the trial judge may ......
  • Request a trial to view additional results

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