Larson v. State, 112818 AKCA, A-12876

Docket Nº:A-12876
Opinion Judge:MANNHEIMER, JUDGE.
Party Name:LOREN J. LARSON JR., Appellant, v. STATE OF ALASKA, Appellee.
Attorney:Loren J. Larson Jr., in propria persona, Wasilla, for the Appellant. Eric A. Ringsmuth, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Criminal Appeals, Anchorage, and Jahna Lindemuth, Attorney General, Juneau, for the Appellee.
Judge Panel:Before: Mannheimer, Chief Judge, Allard, Judge, and Coats, Senior Judge.
Case Date:November 28, 2018
Court:Court of Appeals of Alaska
 
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LOREN J. LARSON JR., Appellant,

v.

STATE OF ALASKA, Appellee.

No. A-12876

Court of Appeals of Alaska

November 28, 2018

UNPUBLISHED See Alaska Appellate Rule 214(d)

Appeal from the Superior Court Trial Court No. 4FA-96-3495 CR, Fourth Judicial District, Fairbanks, Paul R. Lyle, Judge.

Loren J. Larson Jr., in propria persona, Wasilla, for the Appellant.

Eric A. Ringsmuth, Assistant Attorney General, Office of Criminal Appeals, Anchorage, and Jahna Lindemuth, Attorney General, Juneau, for the Appellee.

Before: Mannheimer, Chief Judge, Allard, Judge, and Coats, Senior Judge. [*]

MEMORANDUM OPINION

MANNHEIMER, JUDGE.

In 1998, Loren J. Larson Jr. was convicted of a double homicide, and this Court affirmed his convictions on direct appeal. See Larson v. State, unpublished, 2000 WL 19199 (Alaska App. 2000). In the years since then, Larson has pursued numerous collateral attacks on his convictions, based on claims that certain jurors at his trial engaged in improper deliberations, that certain jurors lied during jury selection, and that certain jurors became biased against him because he did not testify at his trial.

See Larson v. State, 79 P.3d 650 (Alaska App. 2003); Larson v. State, 254 P.3d 1073 (Alaska 2011); Larson v. State, unpublished, 2013 WL 4012639 (Alaska App. 2013); Larson v. State, unpublished, 2013 WL 6169314 (Alaska App. 2013); Larson v. Schmidt, unpublished, 2013 WL 6576742 (Alaska App. 2013); Larson v. State, unpublished, 2016 WL 191987 (Alaska App. 2016); and Larson v. State, 407 P.3d 520 (Alaska App. 2017) (and our accompanying unpublished order in Court of Appeals File No. A-12725).

One of these collateral attacks, litigated in 2011-2012, took the form of a motion for a new trial. The superior court denied this new trial motion, both because the motion was untimely (it was filed more than 13 years after Larson was convicted), and also because the motion was based on claims of juror misconduct that were res judicata (since all of these claims either had been or could have been raised in Larson's prior collateral attacks on his convictions).

Larson appealed the...

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