People v. ARACILLO

CourtUnited States State Supreme Court (New York)
Citation766 N.Y.S.2d 522,196 Misc.2d 758
PartiesTHE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, Plaintiff,<BR>v.<BR>ALFONSO ARACILLO, Defendant.
Decision Date06 August 2003

196 Misc.2d 758
766 N.Y.S.2d 522

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, Plaintiff,
v.
ALFONSO ARACILLO, Defendant.

August 6, 2003.


Tapia & Yerrakadu, Elmhurst (Andrew A. Yerrakadu of counsel), for defendant.

Richard A. Brown, District Attorney, Kew Gardens (Dianna Megias of counsel), for plaintiff.

OPINION OF THE COURT

STANLEY B. KATZ, J.

The defendant, charged with rape in the first degree, burglary in the first degree, robbery in the first degree, sexual abuse in the first degree (three counts) and unlawful imprisonment in the first degree, moves pretrial to suppress physical evidence and evidence of statements made.

A Mapp/Huntley hearing was held before this court on August 5, 2003, at which testimony was taken from New York City Police Detective Brian Kenzik of the Special Victims Unit.

[196 Misc.2d 759]

Based upon the credible evidence adduced at the hearing, the court makes the following findings of fact and reaches the following conclusions of law.

Findings of Fact

Detective Brian Kenzik testified that on May 28, 2002 he was assigned to investigate a home invasion/rape that occurred on August 3, 1995. He was assigned the matter after personnel at the New York State DNA databank advised him that blood taken from the defendant while he was incarcerated at the Clinton facility on May 5, 2000 indicated that the defendant was the probable perpetrator of the August 3, 1995 crimes.

On July 3, 2003, Detective Kenzik and his partner, Detective Boyle (who spoke English and Spanish), went to Elmira Correctional Facility in New York, where the defendant was being incarcerated on an unrelated matter. He and Detective Boyle then took the defendant into a private area, where they orally informed him of his Miranda rights in both Spanish and English. The defendant was also given these rights to read from two sheets, one written in Spanish and the other in English, which sheets were introduced into evidence. The defendant then intelligently waived his rights and proceeded to freely and voluntarily make statements and answer questions put forth by the detectives, who were not armed.

On October 29, 2002, Detective Kenzik and Detective Boyle returned to Elmira Correctional Facility, where they again proceeded to privately interview the defendant, after reestablishing in English and Spanish the fact that the defendant understood his Miranda rights, and again intelligently wanted to waive them. He again freely and voluntarily made statements, and answered...

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