People v. Hamilton, Cr. 12642

CourtUnited States State Supreme Court (California)
Writing for the CourtSULLIVAN; TRAYNOR; BURKE; MOSK; McCOMB
Citation77 Cal.Rptr. 785,71 Cal.2d 176,454 P.2d 681
Parties, 454 P.2d 681 The PEOPLE, Plaintiff and Respondent, v. Nora Mae HAMILTON et al., Defendants and Appellants.
Docket NumberCr. 12642
Decision Date28 May 1969

Page 785

77 Cal.Rptr. 785
71 Cal.2d 176, 454 P.2d 681
The PEOPLE, Plaintiff and Respondent,
v.
Nora Mae HAMILTON et al., Defendants and Appellants.
Cr. 12642.
Supreme Court of California,
In Bank.
May 28, 1969.

[71 Cal.2d 177] Marshall Miles and Alan T. Selznick, San Bernardino, under appointments by the

Page 786

[454 P.2d 682] Supreme Court, for defendants and appellants.

Thomas C. Lynch, Atty. Gen., William E. James, Asst. Atty. Gen., and Frederick R. Millar, Jr., Deputy Atty. Gen., for plaintiff and respondent.

SULLIVAN, Justice.

Defendants were charged by information with possession of heroin (Health & Saf.Code, § 11500) and in a second count with possession for sale of amphetamine, a restricted dangerous drug, (Health & Saf.Code, § 11911). After a trial by jury they were found guilty as charged, and each was sentenced to state prison for the term prescribed by law. They appeal from the judgments.

On July 14, 1967, about 11:20 p.m., Edward Noriega, a state narcotics agent, together with several other law enforcement officers, went to a single-family residence in Upland, California, for the purpose of executing a search warrant. Apparently the front door was open and only an unlocked screen door stood between the officers and the interior of the premises. Agent Noriega and another officer went to the screen door and knocked, and a small child appeared in the doorway behind the screen door. The agent asked the child whether her mother or 'Tony' 1 was at home. The child answered [71 Cal.2d 178] 'Yes,' turned, and began walking down a hallway toward the rear of the house. Agent Noriega opened the screen door and followed the child down the hallway. As he approached the door to a rear bedroom, he encountered defendant Hamilton emerging from the bedroom. Looking through the doorway the agent saw defendant Lerma sitting on one of the beds. Before him on the bed were seven bindles of heroin. A subsequent search of the premises revealed a quantity of amphetamine tablets.

Defendants contend that Agent Noriega's entry into their residence was made in violation of section 1531 of the Penal Code, 2 that the evidence obtained as a result of that entry was therefore illegally obtained and should not have been admitted, and that the judgments must be reversed because such evidence was crucial to the convictions. Because the trial of the instant case took place prior to our decision in People v. Gastelo (1968) 67 Cal.2d 586, 63 Cal.Rptr. 10, 432 P.2d 706, defendants may raise this contention for the first time on appeal in spite of the fact that they did not object to the admission of the subject evidence on the ground of noncompliance with section 1531. (People v. De Santiago (1969) 71 A.C. 18, 76 Cal.Rptr. 809, 453 P.2d 353.)

It is undisputed that the officers' conduct prior to entry did not constitute compliance with the provisions of section 1531. Moreover, the record provides no basis to conclude that compliance with that section was excused because of specific factual circumstances giving rise to a reasonable belief on the part of the officers that unannounced entry was necessary to prevent destruction of evidence, discourage escape, or insure the officers' safety. It therefore appears that the entry and the subsequent seizure of evidence were illegal. Because the evidence so obtained was crucial to the convictions, the judgments must be reversed.

The conclusions stated above do not, of course, preclude the possibility of retrial and renewed efforts by the prosecution at that time to show specific facts known to the officers which justified their noncompliance with section 1531. In view of this possibility we deem it expedient to consider at this time one other issue advanced by defendants which may arise again upon

Page 787

[454 P.2d 683] retrial. That issue concerns the sufficiency of the affidavit[71 Cal.2d 179] in support of the warrant upon the authority of which the entry was undertaken. 3

The affidavit in support of the warrant was subscribed and sworn to by Agent Noriega, the arresting officer. It alleged in relevant part as follows: 'That said affiant was informed on July 13, 1967, by confidential reliable informant that Jane Doe Nora also known as Nora Mae Hamilton and John Doe Tony have in their possession at a white single story, one family dwelling located at 822 W. Alpine Street, Upland, Calif. approximately three hundred (300) rolls of dangerous drugs wrapped in tin foil in groups of ten pills per roll. (Para.) That further your affiant reviewed San Bernardino County Sheriff Office report No. D.R. 112302 which indicated Nora Mae Hamilton and Raymond David Padilla were arrested at 822 W. Alpine Street, Upland, California, on April 14, 1967 for Possession of Marijuana and Possession of dangerous drugs found there. The pills found in the April 14, 1967 arrest were amphetamine, wrapped in tin foil in groups of 10. (Para.) That said confidential reliable informant has furnished information in the past which has lead (sic) to eight (8) arrest(s) and convictions for narcotic and dangerous drug offense.'

In Aguilar v. Texas (1964) 378 U.S. 108, 84 S.Ct. 1509, 12 L.Ed.2d 723, the United States Supreme Court stated: 'Although an affidavit may be based upon hearsay information and need not reflect the direct personal observations of the affiant, (citation), the magistrate must be informed of some of the underlying circumstances from which the informant concluded that the narcotics were where he claimed they were, and some of the underlying circumstances from which the officer concluded that the informant, whose identity need not be disclosed (citation), was 'credible' or his information 'reliable. " (Fn. omitted.) (378 U.S. at p. 114, 84 S.Ct. at p. 1514.) The high court has since referred to this formulation as 'Aguilar's two-pronged test.' (Spinelli v. United States (1969) 393 U.S. 410, 413, 89 S.Ct. 584, 21 L.Ed.2d 637.)

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94 practice notes
  • People v. Cooks, Cr. 15402
    • United States
    • California Court of Appeals
    • March 25, 1983
    ...1514, 12 L.Ed.2d 723; Spinelli v. United States (1969) 393 U.S. 410, 413, 89 S.Ct. 584, 587, 21 L.Ed.2d 637; People v. Hamilton (1969) 71 Cal.2d 176, 179-180, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 454 P.2d 681; People v. Benjamin (1969) 71 Cal.2d 296, 301, 78 Cal.Rptr. 510, 455 P.2d 438; People v. Scoma (1969)......
  • People v. Buchanan, Cr. 4718
    • United States
    • California Court of Appeals
    • June 22, 1972
    ...of a warrant in and of itself, an informant's statements must reflect that he spoke with personal knowledge (e.g., People v. Hamilton, 71 Cal.2d 176, 180, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 454 P.2d 681; People v. Scoma, 71 Cal.2d 332, 338, 78 Cal.Rptr. 491, 455 P.2d 419; Skelton v. Superior Court, 1 Cal.3d......
  • People v. Shipstead, Cr. 8549
    • United States
    • California Court of Appeals
    • July 8, 1971
    ...of the alleged illegal acts (see Aguilar v. Texas (1964) 378 U.S. 108, 114, 84 S.Ct. 1509, 12 L.Ed.2d 723; and People v. Hamilton (1969) 71 Cal.2d 176, 179--182, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 454 P.2d 681). He also points out that the officer's knowledge of the prior alleged illegal conduct of the defe......
  • Halpin v. Superior Court
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court (California)
    • April 24, 1972
    ...that the items to be seized were where he claimed they were. In accordance with Aguilar, this court in People v. Hamilton (1969) 71 Cal.2d 176, 179--180, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 787, 454 P.2d 681, 683 required that 'the affidavit . . . allege the informant's statement in language that is factual ......
  • Request a trial to view additional results
94 cases
  • People v. Cooks, Cr. 15402
    • United States
    • California Court of Appeals
    • March 25, 1983
    ...1514, 12 L.Ed.2d 723; Spinelli v. United States (1969) 393 U.S. 410, 413, 89 S.Ct. 584, 587, 21 L.Ed.2d 637; People v. Hamilton (1969) 71 Cal.2d 176, 179-180, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 454 P.2d 681; People v. Benjamin (1969) 71 Cal.2d 296, 301, 78 Cal.Rptr. 510, 455 P.2d 438; People v. Scoma (1969)......
  • People v. Buchanan, Cr. 4718
    • United States
    • California Court of Appeals
    • June 22, 1972
    ...of a warrant in and of itself, an informant's statements must reflect that he spoke with personal knowledge (e.g., People v. Hamilton, 71 Cal.2d 176, 180, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 454 P.2d 681; People v. Scoma, 71 Cal.2d 332, 338, 78 Cal.Rptr. 491, 455 P.2d 419; Skelton v. Superior Court, 1 Cal.3d......
  • People v. Shipstead, Cr. 8549
    • United States
    • California Court of Appeals
    • July 8, 1971
    ...of the alleged illegal acts (see Aguilar v. Texas (1964) 378 U.S. 108, 114, 84 S.Ct. 1509, 12 L.Ed.2d 723; and People v. Hamilton (1969) 71 Cal.2d 176, 179--182, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 454 P.2d 681). He also points out that the officer's knowledge of the prior alleged illegal conduct of the defe......
  • Halpin v. Superior Court
    • United States
    • United States State Supreme Court (California)
    • April 24, 1972
    ...that the items to be seized were where he claimed they were. In accordance with Aguilar, this court in People v. Hamilton (1969) 71 Cal.2d 176, 179--180, 77 Cal.Rptr. 785, 787, 454 P.2d 681, 683 required that 'the affidavit . . . allege the informant's statement in language that is factual ......
  • Request a trial to view additional results

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