Twitchell v. Twitchell, 20200546-CA

CourtCourt of Appeals of Utah
Writing for the CourtCHRISTIANSEN FORSTER, Judge
Citation509 P.3d 806
Parties Jazmin S. TWITCHELL, Appellee, v. Joseph N. TWITCHELL, Appellant.
Docket Number20200546-CA
Decision Date14 April 2022

509 P.3d 806

Jazmin S. TWITCHELL, Appellee,
v.
Joseph N. TWITCHELL, Appellant.

No. 20200546-CA

Court of Appeals of Utah.

Filed April 14, 2022


Ryan L. Holdaway and Diane Pitcher, Logan, Attorneys for Appellant

Robert L. Neeley, Ogden, Attorney for Appellee

Judge Michele M. Christiansen Forster authored this Opinion, in which Judges David N. Mortensen and Jill M. Pohlman concurred.

Opinion

CHRISTIANSEN FORSTER, Judge:

¶1 Joseph N. Twitchell appeals from a divorce decree and appurtenant findings of fact and conclusions of law, arguing that the district court failed to consider relevant statutory factors when forming its custody determination, awarded him less parent-time than the statutory minimum, and erroneously calculated his child support obligation based on an inaccurate accounting of the income of his ex-wife, Jazmin S. Twitchell. We find Joseph's arguments persuasive on each of these issues, and accordingly, we remand for further proceedings.

BACKGROUND

¶2 Joseph and Jazmin1 were married in 2016 and share one child (Child), who was born in May 2017. The parties "separated

509 P.3d 809

about a year after she was born." Shortly thereafter, in June 2018, Jazmin filed for divorce, citing "irreconcilable differences."

¶3 The court issued temporary orders in December 2018, awarding the parties joint legal custody of Child and designating Jazmin as the primary physical custodian, "subject to [Joseph's] right to parent-time." As to the parent-time schedule, the court directed the parties to follow the minimum schedule set out in section 30-3-35 of the Utah Code, with Joseph generally "designated as the non-custodial parent," meaning that he could exercise parent-time on alternating weekends. In addition, the temporary orders granted Joseph an additional overnight with Child "every Thursday night," with Joseph keeping Child for the weekend when it was one of his parent-time weekends and returning Child to Jazmin's care by noon on Friday when it was not.

¶4 As the case proceeded to trial, Jazmin filed her financial disclosures, dated November 7, 2019. In her disclosures, Jazmin reported her gross monthly income as $2,111. In this document, under an entry entitled "Employment Status," Jazmin listed the name of a child care center where she worked at some point. Under an entry for "Name of Employer," she listed a local private school. Jazmin also filed a supplemental disclosure, dated September 23, 2019, informing the court that she had been serving as a "houseparent" at the private school since September 1, 2019, for which she received no monetary compensation but was provided room and board. Jazmin included a letter from a representative of the school who estimated that the value of the housing and utilities provided to Jazmin was $980 per month.

¶5 A two-day trial was held in December 2019, at which multiple witnesses testified. During Joseph's testimony, he described instances of physical and verbal altercations beginning a few months into the parties’ marriage. He averred that the first time things became physical between the two was in November 2016, when stress regarding the upcoming holiday season resulted in an argument and Jazmin eventually "going after [him] with a knife," cutting his hand. Joseph also described a time in Spring 2017 when he and Jazmin were in another argument, and he "went to go give her a hug and apologize ... and she bit [his] right arm." He then described one more instance where Jazmin told Joseph "she hated [him], over and over and over again," which prompted him to threaten leaving with Child. In response, Jazmin "slapped or hit [him] with something across the face." Joseph also presented photographs of injuries he sustained from each of these incidents, which were admitted into evidence without objection.

¶6 Several witnesses also testified as to their observations of Child's condition once she went from Jazmin's to Joseph's care. One witness testified that on multiple occasions when Joseph received Child from Jazmin, Child had "severe diaper rashes" with blistering, "yeast infections," and "bite marks on her feet," and that she was "really dehydrated" to the point of not "even having a bowel movement for a day or two after." Another witness also confirmed that Child had severe diaper rashes when she came to Joseph, to the point that Joseph had to seek care from a pediatrician, and testified that Child often "had bite marks on both her hands ... and her feet." Joseph also produced evidence documenting incidents of what he characterizes as "assaults" from other children at a daycare while Child was in Jazmin's care.

¶7 Jazmin testified about her employment history since the parties’ separation. During the marriage, Jazmin had been "a stay-at-home mom," but she started a job "within two weeks of leaving" to help provide for Child. She testified to working at a child care center from approximately July 2018 until March 2019, when she left to accept an offer to work for higher pay at another daycare center. She worked at that second center full-time until October 2019. Jazmin began serving as a houseparent at the private school in September 2019, a role she was still working in at the time of trial.

¶8 In addition to her financial disclosure in which she reported the aforementioned $2,111 figure, Jazmin also offered her 2018 tax return into evidence. That return listed only the first child care center as her employer

509 P.3d 810

and an annual gross income of $7,044.75—which would translate to approximately $587 per month. Jazmin nevertheless confirmed at trial that her gross monthly income was $2,100. When asked if that amount included the $980 value of her housing and utilities, she stated, "No. That ... doesn't have anything to do with that." When asked about her current employment, she testified that she had just started working as a substitute teacher earning $75 per day, which she "guesstimate[d]" she did two to three days per week. Based on that "guesstimate," Jazmin testified that she earned approximately $813 per month from substitute teaching as opposed to the $2,100 in her financial declaration. Jazmin also confirmed that, at the time of trial, she had no sources of income other than her "service as a houseparent, [and her] income from substitute teaching."

¶9 Later, on cross-examination, when asked about the $2,111 reported as her gross monthly income in her disclosure, Jazmin admitted that there was actually "no documentation being provided with that [disclosure] that would substantiate that number." While Jazmin was being cross-examined, the court interjected and expressed its confusion as to whether the $980 value of her housing expenses had been included in her reported monthly income; although Jazmin never answered the court directly, her attorney asserted that it was included within that amount (contradicting Jazmin's earlier testimony in which she had stated the opposite). Jazmin also stated that at the time of trial, she had actually worked as a substitute teacher on only one occasion up to that point.

¶10 Testimony was also given by a representative of the private school, whom Jazmin had contacted to secure documentation of the value of her housing and utilities. A final draft of a letter from the representative was attached to Jazmin's supplemental disclosure. But at trial, Joseph offered evidence of an earlier draft of the letter in which the representative had originally stated that the value of what Jazmin received was estimated at $1,800 per month for rent and $1,000 per month for utilities, whereas the amount given in the final letter was $980 for both rent and utilities. The representative testified that she had sent the initial draft to Jazmin's grandmother asking if it was "acceptable," and either Jazmin or her grandmother had then asked additional questions about the square footage and what portion of the house Jazmin was actually living in, and whether that was reflected in the amount the representative gave. This prompted the representative to change the amount to $980 in the final letter, based on a "pro-rated amount" that seemed more consistent with the part of the house where Jazmin was living.

¶11 The court issued findings of fact and conclusions of law in April 2020.2 While it awarded the parties joint legal custody of Child, it also found that it was in Child's "best interest" that Jazmin be awarded primary physical custody. In support, the court cited the following findings: Jazmin had primary physical custody of Child since the parties separated, and the parties had been "following" the parent-time schedule imposed by the court in its temporary orders, consisting of "alternating weekends, with [Joseph] being awarded overnight every Thursday"; Child was "happy and well[-]adjusted and [was] progressing well developmentally"; Child was "closely bonded to [Jazmin] as she ha[d] been the primary custodial parent since birth, while [Joseph] was the primary bread winner in the family"; it was in Child's "best interest ... to maintain a close relationship with her half sister," of whom Jazmin has

509 P.3d 811

primary physical custody; Jazmin had "exhibited good parenting skills" and was "of good moral character, and emotionally stable"; Jazmin had "exhibited...

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