People v. Wilson

Decision Date27 July 2016
Citation2016 N.Y. Slip Op. 05660,35 N.Y.S.3d 482,141 A.D.3d 737
PartiesThe PEOPLE, etc., respondent, v. Shamduh WILSON, appellant.
CourtNew York Supreme Court — Appellate Division

Lynn W.L. Fahey, New York, N.Y. (Steven R. Bernhard of counsel), for appellant.

Kenneth P. Thompson, District Attorney, Brooklyn, N.Y. (Leonard Joblove and Keith Dolan of counsel), for respondent.

JOHN M. LEVENTHAL, J.P., L. PRISCILLA HALL, LEONARD B. AUSTIN, and BETSY BARROS, JJ.

Appeals by the defendant (1) from a judgment of the Supreme Court, Kings County (Lott, J.), rendered March 29, 2007, convicting him of assault in the first degree, manslaughter in the first degree, and criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree, upon a jury verdict, and sentencing him to determinate terms of imprisonment of 15 years on the conviction of assault in the first degree, 25 years on the conviction of manslaughter in the first degree, and 10 years on the conviction of criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree, with the sentences on the convictions of assault in the first degree and manslaughter in the first degree to run concurrently with each other, and the sentence on the conviction of criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree to run consecutively to the concurrent sentences, (2) from a judgment of the same court (Firetog, J.) rendered December 8, 2010, convicting him of conspiracy in the second degree, upon a jury verdict, and imposing sentence, and (3), by permission, as limited by his brief, from so much of an order of the same court (Balter, J.) entered October 7, 2011, as denied, without a hearing, that branch of his motion which was pursuant to CPL 440.10 to vacate the judgment rendered March 29, 2007, on the ground that he was deprived of the effective assistance of counsel.

ORDERED that the judgment rendered March 29, 2007, is modified, as a matter of discretion in the interest of justice, by providing that all of the sentences imposed shall run concurrently with each other; as so modified, the judgment is affirmed; and it is further,

ORDERED that the judgment rendered December 8, 2010, is reversed, on the law, and the matter is remitted to the Supreme Court, Kings County, for further proceedings consistent herewith; and it is further,

ORDERED that the order entered October 7, 2011, is affirmed insofar as appealed from.

In a judgment rendered March 29, 2007, the defendant was convicted of assault in the first degree, manslaughter in the first degree, and criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree for shooting Andre Wheatley and killing an innocent bystander. In a judgment rendered December 8, 2010, the defendant was convicted of conspiracy in the second degree for conspiring to murder Wheatley. In an order entered October 7, 2011, the Supreme Court denied, without a hearing, that branch of the defendant's motion which was pursuant to CPL 440.10 to vacate the judgment rendered March 29, 2007. The defendant appeals from the judgments and the order.

With respect to the judgment rendered March 29, 2007, the defendant's contention that the Supreme Court's charge on justification precluded proper consideration of his justification defense is partially unpreserved for appellate review and, in any event, without merit. The court's charge did not unfairly marshal the evidence and, when read against the background of the evidence presented and taken as a whole, conveyed the correct standard to the jury (see People v. Umali, 10 N.Y.3d 417, 859 N.Y.S.2d 104, 888 N.E.2d 1046 ; cf. People v. Walker, 26 N.Y.3d 170, 21 N.Y.S.3d 191, 42 N.E.3d 688 ).

The defendant's contention that he was deprived of his right to a fair trial by prosecutorial misconduct is without merit. Under the circumstances of this case, the defendant was not deprived of a fair trial by any reference to his parole status (see People v. Reid, 34 A.D.3d 1273, 825 N.Y.S.2d 619 ; People v. Thigpen, 30 A.D.3d 1047, 816 N.Y.S.2d 262 ; see also People v. Wright, 85 A.D.3d 1642, 924 N.Y.S.2d 701 ). Moreover, the prosecutor's cross-examination of a defense witness in a manner that conveyed to the jury that the defendant was incarcerated was not so egregious as to deprive the defendant of a fair trial (see People v. Pringle, 136 A.D.3d 1061, 25 N.Y.S.3d 635 ; People v. Barber, 133 A.D.3d 868, 22 N.Y.S.3d 63 ; People v. Pinkney, 48 A.D.3d 707, 852 N.Y.S.2d 306 ). The defendant's additional contention that he was deprived of a fair trial by the prosecutor's improper references to his alleged nickname, “Pit Bull,” is unpreserved for appellate review (see CPL 470.05[2] ). In any event, any misconduct in the prosecutor's references to the defendant's alleged nickname was not so egregious as to deprive the defendant of a fair trial (see People v. Pringle, 136 A.D.3d 1061, 25 N.Y.S.3d 635 ; see also People v. Dunbar, 74 A.D.3d 1227, 905 N.Y.S.2d 222 ; People v. Ortiz, 46 A.D.3d 580, 846 N.Y.S.2d 370 ; cf. People v. Lauderdale, 295 A.D.2d 539, 540, 746 N.Y.S.2d 163 ; People v. Santiago, 255 A.D.2d 63, 691 N.Y.S.2d 22 ).

The defendant's contention that the evidence was legally insufficient to prove the serious physical injury element of assault in the first degree is unpreserved for appellate review (see People v. Gray, 86 N.Y.2d 10, 629 N.Y.S.2d 173, 652 N.E.2d 919 ). In any event, viewing the evidence in the light most favorable to the prosecution (see People v. Contes, 60 N.Y.2d 620, 467 N.Y.S.2d 349, 454 N.E.2d 932 ), we find that it was legally sufficient to establish the defendant's guilt of assault in the first degree beyond a reasonable doubt (see Penal Law §§ 10.00[10] ; 120.10[1]; People v. Graham, 297 A.D.2d 579, 747 N.Y.S.2d 171 ; People v. McDuffie, 293 A.D.2d 287, 740 N.Y.S.2d 48 ; People v. Moreno, 233 A.D.2d 531, 650 N.Y.S.2d 306 ; People v. Wright, 221 A.D.2d 577, 633 N.Y.S.2d 833 ). Moreover, upon our independent review of the evidence pursuant to CPL 470.15(5), we are satisfied that the verdict of guilt on the count of assault in the first degree was not against the weight of the evidence (see People v. Romero, 7 N.Y.3d 633, 826 N.Y.S.2d 163, 859 N.E.2d 902 ).

Viewing the record as a whole, defense counsel provided meaningful representation, as defense counsel, inter alia, pursued a reasonable trial strategy, conducted meaningful cross-examination of the People's witnesses, presented a witness for the defense, and delivered a cogent summation, resulting in the defendant's acquittal on the most serious charges (see People v. Lutchman, 121 A.D.3d 716, 993 N.Y.S.2d 350 ; People v. Medina, 90 A.D.3d 950, 935 N.Y.S.2d 137 ; People v. Hall, 68 A.D.3d 1133, 892 N.Y.S.2d 457 ; People v. Waisome, 40 A.D.3d 892, 834 N.Y.S.2d 484 ).

As the evidence supported a finding that the defendant possessed a loaded firearm with an intent to use it unlawfully against another that was separate from his intent during the actual shooting, the Supreme Court did not err in directing that the sentence imposed on the conviction of criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree run consecutively to the concurrent sentences imposed on the convictions of assault in the first degree and manslaughter in the first degree (see People v. Salcedo, 92 N.Y.2d 1019, 684 N.Y.S.2d 480, 707 N.E.2d 435 ; cf. People v. Wright, 19 N.Y.3d 359, 948 N.Y.S.2d 228, 971 N.E.2d 358 ). However, while there was no legal impediment to the imposition of a consecutive sentence on the conviction of criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree, the consecutive sentence...

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11 cases
  • People v. Butts
    • United States
    • New York Supreme Court — Appellate Division
    • June 10, 2020
    ...of the defendant's nickname, while improper, was not so egregious as to deprive the defendant of a fair trial (see People v. Wilson, 141 A.D.3d 737, 739, 35 N.Y.S.3d 482 ).We need not reach the defendant's remaining contentions, including the contention raised in his pro se supplemental bri......
  • People v. Guzman
    • United States
    • New York Supreme Court — Appellate Division
    • September 13, 2017
    ...that it would, or with knowledge that it was likely to, have such particular effect therein" ( CPL 20.40[2][c] ; see People v. Wilson, 141 A.D.3d 737, 740, 35 N.Y.S.3d 482 ). A "particular effect of an offense" is defined as "a materially harmful impact upon the ... community welfare of a p......
  • People v. Williams
    • United States
    • New York Supreme Court — Appellate Division
    • June 6, 2018
    ...of a weapon in the second degree (see People v. Wright, 19 N.Y.3d 359, 365–366, 948 N.Y.S.2d 228, 971 N.E.2d 358 ; People v. Wilson, 141 A.D.3d 737, 739, 35 N.Y.S.3d 482 ). Since the defendant's conviction of criminal possession of a weapon in the second degree was not an inclusory concurre......
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    • United States
    • New York Supreme Court — Appellate Division
    • September 16, 2020
    ...witness regarding the defendant's incarceration was not so egregious as to deprive the defendant of a fair trial (see People v. Wilson, 141 A.D.3d 737, 738, 35 N.Y.S.3d 482 ). Moreover, any error was otherwise harmless because there was overwhelming evidence of the defendant's guilt and no ......
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