State v. Miller, 2018-UP-086

CourtCourt of Appeals of South Carolina
Writing for the CourtPER CURIAM:
Decision Date14 February 2018
PartiesThe State, Respondent, v. James B. Miller, Appellant.
Docket NumberAppellate Case 2015-002664,2018-UP-086

The State, Respondent,
v.

James B. Miller, Appellant.

No. 2018-UP-086

Appellate Case No. 2015-002664

Court of Appeals of South Carolina

February 14, 2018


THIS OPINION HAS NO PRECEDENTIAL VALUE. IT SHOULD NOT BE CITED OR RELIED ON AS PRECEDENT IN ANY PROCEEDING EXCEPT AS PROVIDED BY RULE 268(d)(2), SCACR.

Submitted January 1, 2018

Appeal From Lexington County Doyet A. Early, III, Circuit Court Judge

Deputy Chief Appellate Defender Wanda H. Carter, of Columbia, for Appellant.

Attorney General Alan McCrory Wilson and Assistant Attorney General Jennifer Ellis Roberts, both of Columbia, and Solicitor Samuel R. Hubbard, III, of Lexington, for Respondent.

PER CURIAM:

James B. Miller appeals his convictions for possession of altered pseudoephedrine and manufacturing methamphetamine. On appeal, Miller argues the trial court erred by (1) denying his motion to suppress evidence found at the crime scene and (2) denying his motion for a mistrial. We affirm[1] pursuant to Rule 220(b), SCACR, and the following authorities:

1. As to whether the trial court erred in denying Miller's motion to suppress: State v. Taylor, 360 S.C. 18, 23, 598 S.E.2d 735, 737 (Ct. App. 2004) ("The admission of evidence is addressed to the sound discretion of the trial [court]."); State v. Moore, 377 S.C. 299, 306, 659 S.E.2d 256, 259-60 (Ct. App. 2008) ("In an appeal from a motion to suppress evidence based on Fourth Amendment grounds, our review is limited to determining whether any evidence supports the [trial] court's decision."); State v. Missouri, 361 S.C. 107, 112, 603 S.E.2d 594, 596 (2004) ("To claim protection under the Fourth Amendment . . ., defendants must show that they have a legitimate expectation of privacy in the place searched."); State v. Robinson, 396 S.C. 577, 584, 722 S.E.2d 820, 823 (Ct. App. 2012) ("While an overnight guest may have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the host's property, 'a person present only intermittently or for a purely commercial purpose does not have a reasonable expectation of privacy.'" (quoting State v. Flowers, 360 S.C. 1, 5, 598 S.E.2d 725, 728 (Ct. App. 2004))); Flowers, 360 S.C. at 5, 598 S.E.2d at 728 ("A reasonable expectation of privacy exists when the defendant has a relationship with the property or property owner."); State v. Counts, 413 S.C. 153, 172, 776 S.E.2d 59, 70 (2015) (holding law enforcement must have reasonable suspicion of illegal activity at a targeted residence prior to...

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